2009-05-24 23:50:19 2009-05-24 23:50:19. We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow, And the dark street winds and bends. To cool in the peppermint wind. Sidewalks are something that we associate with the city – when the sidewalk ends, the chaotic city turns away and we encounter raw nature. The value in thinking and acting like a child best describes a shared idea. Rhyme! Yes we’ll walk with a walk that is measured and slow, And we’ll go where the chalk-white arrows go, For the children, they mark, and the children, they know The place where the sidewalk ends. Form and Meter. On the surface, this poem seems like a pleasant childhood dream, but if we look at it again more carefully, we can see examples of imagery, metaphor, and symbolism. And there the grass grows soft and white,
Another interpretation of the ending of the sidewalk might be that it represents the end of childhood and the entrance into the adult world. And the dark street winds and bends. In “Where the Sidewalk Ends,” the first stanza creates a Utopia for the reader. Plot: In “Where the Sidewalk Ends,” it explains the contrast between Utopia and today’s society. I think this is important because these three lines where Silverstein uses ‘and there’ are describing “the better place” and therefore making that part of the poem stand out more.
If you choose correctly, eleven phrases will highlight. Featured Quizzes. In this reading, Hector comes to symbolizes those with a deeper compassion and empathy for the human outcasts rejected by society as ever so much junk. There is a place where the sidewalk ends And before the street begins, And there the grass grows soft and white, And there the sun burns crimson bright, And there the moon-bird rests from his flight To cool in the peppermint wind. Let’s read it again. And we’ll go where the chalk-white arrows go,

While the story could be read symbolically as merely a variation on the idea of one man’s trash being another’s treasure, a deeper interpretation would be inspired by the accompanying artwork showing Hector as being absolutely devastated by the reaction of others and should focus on Hector’s appreciation of the outcasts of society and society’s rejection of him rather than his collection. These notes were contributed by members of the GradeSaver community. When he extends an invitation for others to share his treasures, they reject it as junk. Then stanza three explains how our next generation can fix the problem in an innocent way. This poem, published in 1974, carries messages of going back to nature, remembering youth, and provides inspiring imagery of a clean, beautiful world.