They were Mr Eric Taylor, aged 54, chairman of the party's north west area, Sir Anthony Berry, aged 59, MP for Enfield, Southgate, Mrs Anne Wakeham, aged 45, wife of the government chief whip, Mrs Jeanne Shattock, aged 52, wife of the chairman of the party's western area, and Mrs Muriel McLean, aged 54, wife of the Chairman of the Scottish Conservatives. Magee had planted the bomb, with a long-term timer, wrapped in plastic to deceive sniffer dogs, under a bath in Room 629. “It appeared as if a huge gaping lift shaft had opened up with all the debris and evidence sinking to the bottom,” Reece recalled.Many ministers had been inside, attending the Conservative Party conference. He planted the bomb, with a long-delay timer, in the bathroom wall of his room, number 629.

A Conservative MP, Sir Anthony Berry (Deputy Chief Whip),[10] was killed, along with Eric Taylor (North-West Area Chairman of the Conservative Party), Lady Shattock (Jeanne, wife of Sir Gordon Shattock, Western Area Chairman of the Conservative Party), Lady Maclean (Muriel, wife of Sir Donald Maclean, President of the Scottish Conservatives), and Roberta Wakeham (wife of Chief Whip John Wakeham). Patrick Magee was born in Belfast and moved with his family to Norwich when he was two years old. However, Magee was released from prison in 1999 under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement, having served 14 years (including the time before his sentencing). "[14] Immediately afterwards, her popularity soared almost to the level it had been during the Falklands War. The then trade secretary and his wife Margaret were lying in bed when their ceiling collapsed. By … There would be a further shock for Reece when Magee was released under the Good Friday Agreement of April 1998. He planted a bomb with a … Mr Gordon Shattock, and his wife, Jeanne, took Room 628. [8] A British Government spokesman said that his release "was hard to stomach" and an appeal by then Home Secretary Jack Straw to forestall it was turned down by the Northern Ireland High Court. For Second World War bombings, see, The Grand Hotel on the morning after the bombing, The assassination attempt targeted the entire, Chronology of Provisional Irish Republican Army actions (1980–89), "1984: Tory Cabinet in Brighton bomb blast", "Patrick Magee convicted of IRA terrorist attack", "Brighton bombing: Daily Telegraph journalist recalls", "Brighton bombing: 25th anniversary of Sir Anthony Berry's death remembered", “Nice to have you back where you belong..”, Margaret Thatcher, Speech to Conservative Party Conference, 12 October 1984, Margaret Thatcher, Speech to Finchley Conservatives, 20 October 1984, "On This Day: Thatcher almost killed by IRA in Brighton bombing", "Brighton Bomb was a turning point – Magee", "Margaret Thatcher: a figure of history and legend", "Review: Jonathan Lee's 'High Dive' Revisits a Plot to Kill Margaret Thatcher", "Gripping RUC thriller has Troubles in mind", Text of the BBC television news report on the morning of the attack, BBC News report on Straw's attempt to prevent the early release of Magee, BBC report on Magee being convicted of the bombing, Belfast, Crumlin, Killyleagh & Coleraine attacks, Ceasefires of the Provisional IRA, UVF, UDA and RHC, Brighton, Worthing & District Football League, Public Bodies (Admission to Meetings) Act (1960), Statecraft: Strategies for a Changing World, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Brighton_hotel_bombing&oldid=981412851, Attacks on buildings and structures in 1984, Attacks on buildings and structures in England, Failed assassination attempts in the United Kingdom, Improvised explosive device bombings in 1984, Improvised explosive device bombings in England, October 1984 events in the United Kingdom, Terrorist incidents in the United Kingdom in 1984, Articles with unsourced statements from October 2019, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 2 October 2020, at 04:39. For the burly 6ft Yorkshireman known as “big Jack”, the £1m investigation, which put him on an IRA death list, was to test his leadership, keeping up staff morale in the long hunt – and, at its end, his steadiness under questioning in court. Between 1980 and 1981, while detained … Repatriated to Ireland, the country refused to extradite him to the UK believing he would not receive a fair trial. Are you sure you want to mark this comment as inappropriate? The bomb was activated that evening when the occupants of the room ordered a bottle of vodka and three cokes. Due to the sheer scale of this comment community, we are not able to give each post the same level of attention, but we have preserved this area in the interests of open debate. Sir Donald McLean and his wife Muriel, booked in to Room 629 on October 9, at the start of the conference week. [25], Jonathan Lee's 2015 novel High Dive is a fictionalised account of the bombing, written largely from the alternating perspectives of the hotel manager, his teenage daughter, and an IRA bombmaker who helps Magee. For WWII bombers, see, "Staying in: The night they bombed the Grand", "Patrick Magee convicted of IRA terrorist attack", "1984: Tory Cabinet in Brighton bomb blast", "Patrick Magee: my Troubles with fiction", "BBC News - UK Politics - IRA prisoners to go free", "BBC NEWS - Programmes - Politics Show - Lord Tebbit on the Brighton bomb", Book review, with full Appendix A: Troubles Fiction bibliography, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Patrick_Magee_(Irish_republican)&oldid=983719052, 20th-century people from Northern Ireland, Irish prisoners sentenced to life imprisonment, Irish republicans imprisoned under Prevention of Terrorism Acts, People convicted of murder by England and Wales, People from Northern Ireland convicted of murder, Prisoners accorded Special Category Status, Prisoners sentenced to life imprisonment by England and Wales, Provisional Irish Republican Army members, All articles with vague or ambiguous time, Articles with unsourced statements from June 2019, Wikipedia articles with WorldCat identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 15 October 2020, at 21:05.