At Studio Olafur Eliasson, 3D scanning a block of ice harvested for Ice Watch (2015) 2016 — Digital image ⤶ The first installation was in Copenhagen, at City Hall Square, from 26 to 29 October 2014, to mark the publication of the UN IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report on Climate Change. +49 30 2000 391 50, VAT ID: DE 247257125 The sharing buttons on this site that allow visitors to share content onto social networks use cookies. The hunks of ice are scattered across two locations. The cookies are set by domains external to this website and are required in order to implement these buttons and connect them to the relevant social networks and third party sites. The second installation took place in Paris, at Place du Panthéon, from 3 to 13 December 2015, on the occasion of the UN Climate Conference COP21, and the third version of Ice Watch was on view from 11 December 2018 to 2 January 2019 at two locations in London – outside Bloomberg’s European headquarters and in front of Tate Modern. Ice Watch comes 15 years after Eliasson's previous Tate installation, The Weather Project, which created a glowing sun in the Tate Modern's Turbine Hall. The work raises awareness of climate change by providing a direct and tangible experience of the reality of melting arctic ice. The project remains one of … 10119 Berlin, Contact "We must recognise that together we have the power to take individual actions and to push for systematic change. "It is a lot more physical; it suddenly gives a stronger sense of what it is they're talking about when they say the Greenland ice caps are melting," he explained. This is the third part of the Ice Watch series, which first took place in Copenhagen in 2014 and then again in Paris in 2015.The brains behind the project are the artist Olafur Eliasson and the geologist Minik Rosing. : 37/415/21533 Commercial registry: HRB 99366 Registration office: Amtsgericht Charlottenburg. Studio Olafur Eliasson GmbH explicitly reserves the right to alter, supplement, or delete parts or the whole of the website's content, or to temporarily or completely discontinue publication without further notice. The project remains one of the museum's most popular installations of all time. Related story"Let's start designing the future that gives us a future". Eliasson hopes this latest project – which follows a similar installation by the Place de Panthéon in Paris in 2015 – can have a similar impact. A major exhibition of Eliasson's artwork will follow at Tate Modern in July 2019. Dezeen Weekly subscribers will also receive occasional updates about events, competitions and breaking news. Dezeen Weekly is a curated newsletter that is sent every Thursday, containing highlights from Dezeen. "Ten thousand years ago there was 30 per cent less carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, so the smell of the ice blocks should be the smell of the air from 10,000 years ago.". Ice watch, 2015 Details Type: Artist's booklet: Author: Olafur Eliasson Prof. Minik Thorleif Rosing Studio Olafur Eliasson: Publisher "The ice is amazingly beautiful – you can smell it, you can kiss it, and essentially put your hands on it and touch Greenland," said Eliasson. The second installation took place in Paris, at Place du Panthéon, from 3 to 13 December 2015, on the occasion of the UN Climate Conference COP21, and the third version of Ice Watch was on view from 11 December 2018 to 2 January 2019 at two locations in London – outside Bloomberg’s European headquarters and in front of Tate Modern. Earth is changing at an ever-increasing speed," said Rosing. Members of the public can interact with the blocks and watch as the ice thaws in front of them. Christinenstrasse 18/19, Haus 2 Twelve large blocks of ice cast off from the Greenland ice sheet are harvested from a fjord outside Nuuk and presented in a clock formation in a prominent public place. Dezeen Daily is sent every day and contains all the latest stories from Dezeen. "Since 2015, the melting of ice in Greenland has raised global sea level by 2.5 millimetres. Studio Olafur Eliasson GmbH