MARSHMALLOW Meaning: "kind of mallow plant (Althea officinalis) which grows near salt marshes;" from marsh + mallow. *marisko (Cf. and is usual for -er- followed by a consonant: Compare darling (Middle English dereling, Old English deorling), far (Middle English fer, Old English feorr), mar (Middle English merren), hart (Middle English hert, Old English heorot). OK, The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. More at mere.

Lower, Mark A (1860) Patronymica Britannica: a dictionary of the family names of the United Kingdom. From Middle English mersh, mershe, from Old English mersċ, merisċ, from Proto-West Germanic *marisk, derived from *mari, equivalent to mere (“sea, body of water”) +‎ -ish. marsk), probably from P.Gmc. Marsch, Dan. Public Domain. Cognate with West Frisian mersk, Dutch meers (“grassland, meadow”), German Marsch. )). 2. having many marshes; swampy: » …   Useful english dictionary, Marsh — Marsh, 1) Herbert, geb.

Noun . History and Etymology for marsh. (n.) O.E. The vowel shift from -e- to -a- began in 15c. From Middle English mersh, mershe, from Old English mersċ, merisċ, from Proto-Germanic *mariskaz, derived from *mari, equivalent to mere (“sea, body of water”) +‎ -ish. Cognate with West Frisian mersk, Dutch meers (“grassland, meadow”), German Marsch. Perhaps from Frankish *markon or some other Germanic source related to Middle English march (n.) "borderland" (see march (n.2)). The online etymology dictionary is the internet's go-to source for quick and reliable accounts of the origin and history of English words, phrases, and idioms. ?, low and marsh}' ground, as Hindmarsh, Saltmarsh, Titmarsh. er; …   English syllables, Marsh — Marsh, James * * * (as used in expressions) Marsh, Dame (Edith) Ngaio Marsh, O(thniel) C(harles) Marsh, Reginald …   Enciclopedia Universal, marsh|y — «MAHR shee», adjective, marsh|i|er, marsh|i|est. Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary, https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=marsh&oldid=60440567, English terms inherited from Middle English, English terms derived from Middle English, English terms inherited from Proto-West Germanic, English terms derived from Proto-West Germanic, Entries using missing taxonomic name (species), Entries missing English vernacular names of taxa, Entries using missing taxonomic name (genus), Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. O.Fris, O.S. It is professional enough to satisfy academic standards, but accessible enough to be used by anyone. The… See definitions of marshmallow.

mars, Ger. More at mere. London: J.R. Smith.

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march (v.) "to walk with measured steps or a regular tread," either individually or as a body, early 15c., from Old French marcher "to stride, march, walk," originally "to trample, tread underfoot," a word of uncertain origin. mersc, merisc marsh, swamp, from W.Gmc. Er hielt zuerst seine Vorlesungen in englischer… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon, Marsh — Très répandu en Angleterre, désigne celui qui habite un lieu dit Marsh (= marécage) …   Noms de famille, Marsh — [märsh] Reginald 1898 1954; U.S. painter …   English World dictionary, marsh — [märsh] n. [ME mersch < OE merisc, akin to MLowG mersch, marsch (> Ger marsch) < IE base * mori, sea > MARE2] a tract of low, wet, soft land that is temporarily, or permanently, covered with water, characterized by aquatic, grasslike… …   English World dictionary, We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. marsk marsh, M.Du. "tract of water-soaked or partially flooded land; wet, swampy ground; piece of low ground, usually more or less wet but often nearly dry at certain seasons," Middle English mersh, from Old English mersc, merisc "marsh, swamp," from Proto-Germanic *marisko (source also of Old Frisian and Old Saxon marsk "marsh," Middle Dutch mersch, Dutch mars, German Marsch, Danish marsk), probably from Proto-Germanic *mari- "sea" (from PIE root *mori- "body of water"). t" MARSH. An area of low, wet land, often with tall grass. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this. The site has become a favorite resource of teachers of reading, spelling, and English as a second language. 1. soft and wet like a marsh: »a marshy field. 1757 in London, studirte in Oxford, Göttingen u. Leipzig, wurde 1807 Professor der Theologie in Cambridge, 1816 Bischof von Llandaff, 1819 von Peterborough u. st. 1839. A termination of various local surnames, implying j;«?;. Marsh gas "methane generated by decaying matter in marshes" is attested by 1819. low-lying wet land with grassy vegetation, usually is a transition zone between land and water, New Zealand writer of detective stories (1899-1982).

mersch, Du. "tract of water-soaked or partially flooded land; wet, swampy ground; piece of low ground, usually more or less wet but often nearly dry at certain seasons," Middle English mersh, from Old English mersc, merisc "marsh, swamp," from Proto-Germanic *marisko (source also of Old Frisian and Old Saxon marsk "marsh," Middle Dutch mersch, Dutch mars, German Marsch, Danish marsk), probably from Proto-Germanic … Middle English mersh, from Old English merisc, mersc; akin to Middle Dutch mersch marsh, Old English mere sea, pool — more at marine